In Tennessee Travel to a National Park That’s So Large, It Sits Across Two Time Zones

On the border that Tennessee shares with the state of Kentucky is a remarkable area of wilderness people interested in Tennessee travel often tend to miss. It is the Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area. One of the most striking places to visit here is natural wonder of the Twin Arches – two remarkably huge natural arches or bridges worn by the effects of time and the elements out of the rocks of the area. These arches are a pair of the largest natural formations you ever see anywhere in the world.

To have one such arch in one place would be a wondrous occurrence by itself. The amazing thing about Big South Fork is the way nature here has shaped two in the same place. The Twin Arches don’t stand that close to each other, even if they areboth in the same place. The North Arch, you’ll find near where the trail to the Charit Creek Lodge and the one to Slave Falls meet. You get here first, and then make your way to the South Arch at some distance away. The South Arch can be a little difficult to find. Once you are at the North Arch, you just need to find the signs that lead you to the Charit Creek Lodge to come upon the South Arch.

The wonderful thing about visiting the South Arch is that the tourists usually leave this spot alone, concentrating on the easier-to-find North Arch. The Arch is formed in such a way that you can walk right through the column on the left. The weather has eroded a tunnel right through the massive pillar of the arch, and if you are slim and in shape, you can probably squeeze right through it and come out at the other end. If you are coming to Tennessee, travel to the Twin Arches should give you a great bit of time alone with nature. There are great picnic spots here next to the Arches too. With huge boulders strewn about that give you a good bit of shade,
picnicking here can be a real treat.

If you want to experience the beauty of Tennessee, travel to the Big South Fork. It’s close to the towns of Oneida and Jamestown, and traveling here isn’t much trouble. Is this National Park worth your time? To begin with, it is so huge, it sits across two time zones – the Central time zone and the Eastern time zone. So in short, it should be worth you time. And then, entry is free. The beauty to be witnessed here is awe-inspiring. And to anyone who lives anywhere near Tennessee, travel to the Big South Fork is an absolute must-do.

Retro Air Travel Returns to Tanzania

When I was a little boy in the 60s and 70s, the Douglas DC-3, which, like they did in Britain we used to call the Dakota, was all the rage. I used to travel around the country in that aircraft with my mum and dad. It was an awesome experience. I used to love the way the tail dipped when the aircraft was on the ground and how it lifted as it taxied down the runway before take off. A remarkable airplane, and one I couldn’t forget even when the Fokker Friendship came to replace it on domestic routes. As it happens, the DC-3 never really went away. 73 years after the DC-3 first flew, it has remained in the skies in quite a few countries around the world… it is believed there are 400 DC-3 aircraft still in service. In this article, I will discuss retro travel and the opportunity that awaits you to rekindle vintage travel in a remarkable tourist haven and setting that is, Tanzania.

One of the most successful airplanes ever built, the DC-3 made its maiden flight on December 17, 1935. The Gooney Bird, as it was sometimes called, was one of the first airplanes built primarily out of metal, replacing the wood-framed-and-doped-fabric airplanes that had evolved out of the Wright Flyer and the many models of airplanes developed during World War I. In the 1930s and 1940s, this American fixed-wing, propeller-driven aircraft — generally regarded as one of the most significant transport aircraft ever made because of its lasting impact on the airline industry and World War II — is still taking to the skies to this day in many parts of the world. Like its land equivalent, the marvels of yesteryear engineering — the steam train — offers a lap of luxury to its passengers to this present day on packaged rail safaris like the Blue Train in South Africa, aviation too brings back the the beauty and luxury of vintage travel to the skies.

Air travel in the 50s was much more regulated than it is today. All fares were fixed by the International Air Traffic Association (IATA). It seems almost inconceivable today, but IATA dictated exactly what could be charged on any particular route. Airlines could compete on standards of service, but not price. Hence a desire to offer the passenger the very best prevailed. In the early fifties there was only one class of travel: first or better than first class. Such luxuries as cocktail bars, and even beds had been provided on transatlantic flights. Fares were expensive and passengers were either very wealthy or claiming the trip on expenses. By the end of the fifties, there were four classes of travel, deluxe (better than first), first class, tourist class and economy class. The Indigo Aviation Dakota plying the Zanzibar, Selous, Pemba and Mafia routes from Dar es salaam, Tanzania, judging from the luxurious cabin alone, takes you back to the early 50s when, literally, there was only one way to travel – first class.

When I saw an ad on the cover of a local magazine (Advertising Dar) back in May 2009, I was thrilled to see the DC-3 back in action. To me, she is the most beautiful bird that ever took to the skies. My plan is to get on that plane to travel to Mafia island, a fascinating island steeped in history, and what I consider to be the ideal destination to fly to to write a series of articles on, in retro style.

How to Use Technology to Plan a Remarkable Vacation

If you can still remember the Flintstone’s, chances are you are not quite as savvy with some of the newest travel technology as the current generation, but it’s never too late to learn.

Tweet a Twacation

Twitter is a powerful tool for friends and family to help keep track of each other, but it also happens to be a nifty search tool in planning some pretty remarkable vacations. Twitter feeds enable various companies, such as Travelocity and American Airlines, to keep their followers up to the minute on the very latest deals and savings going on.

If you thought that registering for a daily travel newsletter was up to the minute, you’re actually missing out on some of the best “last minute” deals available each day. Many of these bargains are only offered on Twitter (United Airlines calls them, “Twares”), so if your not already Tweeting, it might be a good idea to set up an account. An account is not necessary for the search function, but it will allow you to follow other vacationers and ask questions.

The search feature on Twitter allows visitors the opportunity to type keywords, find great deals (type-in “travel deals”), and locate fun things to do (“Christmas festival”, “water park”, etc). A nifty trick is to use a minus sign in front of your initial keywords, followed by another keyword which expresses content you’d like to extract from your search. For instance, if you type, “ski colorado – durango”, it will eliminate all ski related subjects in Colorado associated with Durango, and so forth.

While you’re at your destination, you can also use Twitter to keep abreast of any special events in the area, such as festivals or new exhibits, while also gathering quick consumer reviews on restaurants and attractions. The easiest way to follow this type of “on the road” update, is through a compatible cell, such as an iPhone.

Traveling Via iPhone

Computers are great, but what limits their practicality while on vacation, is their pure cumbersome size and design. This is where an iPhone makes perfect sense. Using one of the many travel applications available (for various fees), you can literally place the entire world at your fingertips, including packing reminders (your toothbrush), and proof to your friends (via GPS) that you are actually where you say you are.

A few popular, “free”, applications to keep in mind for your next trip are Wikitude, Citysearch, GasFoodLodging.mobi, and OpenTable. Wikitude is a useful travel guide holding over 300,000 points of interest. Citysearch locates your favorite shops, restaurants, and night venues. If you like to take roadtrips, GasFoodLodging.mobi helps locate lodging, food, and gas; while the application, OpenTable, helps discern which restaurants are worth your while. OpenTable works by offering consumer ratings along with a sample menus of the types of food served.

Fred Flintstone only wishes he had this kind of practical, technological convenience!